+ Get Design stuff@opntshirt.com
sale
SALE OFF

AVANGERS HULK TSHIRT

$27.00 $25.99

Naruto, Luffy – One Piece, Son Goku, Natsu – Fairy Tail, Hulk – Marvel T-shirt, Mugs & Tote Bag. We design unique for All fan favorite anime. You can see all product anime T-shirt of Opntshirt.com on Teespring & Sunfrog.
Your friend with the same interests?
Don’t forget to like and share!
Follow me at Fanpage ♥♥
Sunfrog

Teespring

Hulk (comics)

 […]

Around this time, co-creator Kirby received a letter from a college dormitory stating the Hulk had been chosen as its official mascot.[8] Kirby and Lee realized their character had found an audience in college-age readers.

A year and a half after The Incredible Hulk was canceled, the Hulk became one of two features in Tales to Astonish, beginning in issue #60 (Oct. 1964).[17]

This new Hulk feature was initially scripted by Lee, with pencils by Steve Ditko and inks by George Roussos. Other artists later in this run included Jack Kirby (#68–87, June 1965 – Oct. 1966); Gil Kane (credited as “Scott Edwards”, #76, (Feb. 1966)); Bill Everett (#78–84, April–Oct. 1966); John Buscema (#85–87); and Marie Severin. The Tales to Astonish run introduced the super-villains the Leader,[3] who would become the Hulk’s nemesis, and the Abomination, another gamma-irradiated being.[3]Marie Severin finished out the Hulk’s run in Tales to Astonish. Beginning with issue #102 (April 1968) the book was retitled The Incredible Hulk vol. 2,[18] and ran until 1999, when Marvel canceled the series and launched Hulk #1. Marvel filed for a trademark for “The Incredible Hulk” in 1967, and the United States Patent and Trademark Office issued the registration in 1970.[19]

Len Wein wrote the series from 1974 through 1978, working first with Herb Trimpe, then, as of issue #194 (December 1975), with Sal Buscema, who was the regular artist for ten years.[20] Issues #180–181 (Oct.–Nov. 1974) introduced the character Wolverine as an antagonist,[21] who would go on to become one of Marvel Comics’ most popular. In 1977, Marvel launched a second title, The Rampaging Hulk, a black-and-white comics magazine.[3] This was originally conceived as a flashback series, set between the end of his original, short-lived solo title and the beginning of his feature in Tales to Astonish.[22] After nine issues, the magazine was retitled The Hulk! and printed in color.[23]

In 1977, two Hulk television films were aired to strong ratings, leading to an Incredible Hulk TV series which aired from 1978 to 1982. A huge ratings success, the series introduced the popular Hulk catchphrase, “Don’t make me angry. You wouldn’t like me when I’m angry”, and broadened the character’s popularity from a niche comic book readership into the mainstream consciousness.[24]

Bill Mantlo became the series’ writer for five years beginning with issue #245 (March 1980). Mantlo’s “Crossroads of Eternity” stories (#300–313, Oct. 1984 – Nov. 1985) explored the idea that Banner had suffered child abuse. Later Hulk writers Peter David and Greg Pak have called these stories an influence on their approaches to the character.[25][26] Mantlo left the series for Alpha Flight and that series’ writer John Byrne took over The Incredible Hulk.[27] The final issue of Byrne’s six issue run featured the wedding of Bruce Banner and Betty Ross.[28] Writer Peter David began a twelve-year run with issue #331 (May 1987). He returned to the Roger Stern and Mantlo abuse storylines, expanding the damage caused, and depicting Banner as suffering dissociative identity disorder (DID).[3]

In 1998, David killed off Banner’s long-time love Betty Ross. Marvel executives used Ross’ death as an opportunity to pursue the return of the Savage Hulk. David disagreed, leading to his parting ways with Marvel.[29] Also in 1998, Marvel relaunched The Rampaging Hulk as a standard comic book rather than as a comics magazine.[3] The Incredible Hulk was again cancelled with issue #474 of its second volume in March 1999 and was replaced with new series, Hulk the following month, with returning writer Byrne and art by Ron Garney.[30][31] By issue #12 (March 2000), Hulk was retitled as The Incredible Hulk vol. 3[32] New series writer Paul Jenkins developed the Hulk’s multiple personalities,[33] and his run was followed by Bruce Jones[34] with his run featuring Banner being pursued by a secret conspiracy and aided by the mysterious Mr. Blue. Jones appended his 43-issue Incredible Hulk run with the limited series Hulk/Thing: Hard Knocks #1–4 (Nov. 2004 – Feb. 2005), which Marvel published after putting the ongoing series on hiatus. Peter David, who had initially signed a contract for the six-issue Tempest Fugit limited series, returned as writer when it was decided to make that story the first five parts of the revived volume three.[35] After a four-part tie-in to the House of M crossover and a one-issue epilogue, David left the series once more, citing the need to do non-Hulk work for the sake of his career.[36]

Writer Greg Pak took over the series in 2006, leading the Hulk through several crossover storylines including “Planet Hulk” and “World War Hulk“, which left the Hulk temporarily incapacitated and replaced as the series’ title character by the demigod Hercules in the retitled The Incredible Hercules (Feb. 2008). The Hulk returned periodically in Hulk, which then starred the new Red Hulk.[37] In September 2009, The Incredible Hulk was relaunched as The Incredible Hulk vol. 2, #600.[37] The series was retitled The Incredible Hulks with issue #612 (Nov. 2010) to encompass the Hulk’s expanded family, and ran until issue #635 (Oct. 2011) when it was replaced with The Incredible Hulk vol. 4, (15 issues, Dec. 2011 – Dec. 2012) written by Jason Aaron with art by Marc Silvestri.[38] As part of Marvel’s Marvel NOW! relaunch, the Hulk’s new title was The Indestructible Hulk (Nov. 2012) under the creative team of Mark Waid and Leinil Yu.[39] This series was replaced in 2014 with The Hulk by Waid and artist Mark Bagley.[40]

Comments

Related products
sale
SALE OFF
Teespring
sale
SALE OFF
Sunfrog
sale
SALE OFF
Teespring
sale
SALE OFF
Teespring